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Happy Sales HSSR200, Japanese Nakiri Chef Knife

  • Happy Sales HSSR200, Japanese Nakiri Chef Knife

Happy Sales HSSR200, Japanese Nakiri Chef Knife

NZ$ 192.00 NZ$ 115.20 Save: NZ$ 76.80
NZ$ 115.20 NZ$ 192.00 You save: NZ$ 76.80

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Delivery Time: 15-20 days
Delivery Time: 15-20 days

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Description
  • Professional Sushi Knife with razor sharp edge
  • Blade Length: 6-5/8 inch, Overall Length: 11-5/8 inch
  • Wooden handle offers maximum comfort and control
  • Material:STAINLESS STEEL NATURAL WOOD
  • Easy to sharpen
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Customer Reviews

very sharp blade, good precision cutting, affordableVery sharp knife that works like an expensive Japanese or German knife. Cuts great, everything from mincing garlic to cutting up a watermelon. I love the affordable price of this knife. It isn't maybe as strong as expensive knives, but it isn't flimsy, either. The handle, as other reviewers said, is unfinished, which in time may be an issue, but for now I really really like this knife and it's sharp blade.4prefect thing use this all the time 5Sekiryu Knives: A Great Bargain in Japanese Cutlery StylesI like these knives so much I bought one of each in the various styles, Deba, Santoku, Nagiri, etc. As these knives are manufactured similarly and exhibit the same qualities you'll see the same review for each of these knives. I specifically sought out Amazon vendors that offered the "Sekiryu" brand of knives. ( http://www.sekiryu.co.jp/wabou/e-81.htm ). This can take a bit of research here on Amazon but I found that their quality seems to be is slightly better than knives of the same style made by another manufacturer and they don't muck up the blade with a bunch of markings other than some nice kanji. These knives are no substitute for a high end Japanese forged high carbon blades so get past that now. They are simply decent bargain priced representations of the style. The blades are made from a "higher" carbon content stainless steel stock to resist rusting and staining but I've found the edge grinds to be true, and the blade sharp out of the box. The handles are wood, smooth and "D" shaped in cross section for right hand use. A plastic "cup" is used to secure the handle to the tang. I can see where these caps might come loose but easily fixed if that happened. The handle is a bit small for very large hands (like mine) and I'm debating doing a cord wrap for a bit more secure ergonomic grip. The trade off being sanitation when food gets in between cord wraps. Considering these knives were made with a smaller sized populace in mind that doesn't surprise me. Its not a deal killer. The blades sharpen well but like many less expensive blades do need more attention to maintain that edge than say a $200+ blade of similar style. That should be intuitively obvious so buyers shouldn't come back crying about how one needs to sharpen these blades on a more regular basis. Its the nature of the metal. For entry level examples of various Japanese cutlery styles I can recommend the Sekiryu products unreservedly.5A great knife regardless of price.I have read several fair reviews, and they are mostly positive, but owning several of them, I feel compelled to point out a couple of oversights by other reviewers.Firstly, I have read several reviews that describe some of the knives as being "too light" or "less sturdy" than others of the same type. They are indeed substantially lighter than many knives of similar style, BUT this is a positive for those folks who actually know how to use a knife. I'm no professional chef, but I know how to use a knife for cutting. These knives are razor sharp, and hold a good edge for a long time when properly used and cared for. They also sharpen relatively easily. That said, if you are looking to cut through bone, get a saw or a cleaver. These knives are designed for cutting flesh and vegetables, not quartering a steer. If you use these knives for cutting up food, they are wonderful. If you use them to chop down walnut saplings in the back yard, there are other, better knives. Think of them as surgical instruments, not hatchets, and they'll serve you well.Secondly, the handles are raw wood. When you get the knife or knives, buy a small can of polyurethane and simply dip the handles and then hang the knife point up, allowing the excess to run off onto a newspaper. leave the knife hanging for 24 hours to allow the finish on the handle to cure. Steel wool the handle lightly with 0000 steel wool, and repeat the dip-hang-cure-steel wool process to get 3 or 4 good coats of polyurethane into the handle. This brings out the beauty of the wooden handles and toughens them considerably as well. It also prevents oils from hands or foods to build up in the wood's grain. I did this to the first of these knives I bought 4 years ago, and the finish is lasting and makes the knife cleaner as well.Lastly, hand wash and then hand dry these knives. They are not for the dishwasher. the hidden-tang handles hold moisture against the blade's tang and will eventually corrode even stainless steel (which is really stain-resistant, not stainLESS). Oil them occasionally with a drop of mineral oil, and sharpen as necessary.With a little care, these knives will be among the finest you own, and after acclimating to the different weight and balance of them, they will quickly become your favorite knives, lasting you for many years.5Good knife for the money for sure Good knife for the money for sure. Came sharp out of the box. Only draw back is the unfinished handle. Will need to lacquer this to make it food safe for regular use. Other than that good buy. 4A great knife regardless of price.I have read several fair reviews, and they are mostly positive, but owning several of them, I feel compelled to point out a couple of oversights by other reviewers.Firstly, I have read several reviews that describe some of the knives as being "too light" or "less sturdy" than others of the same type. They are indeed substantially lighter than many knives of similar style, BUT this is a positive for those folks who actually know how to use a knife. I'm no professional chef, but I know how to use a knife for cutting. These knives are razor sharp, and hold a good edge for a long time when properly used and cared for. They also sharpen relatively easily. That said, if you are looking to cut through bone, get a saw or a cleaver. These knives are designed for cutting flesh and vegetables, not quartering a steer. If you use these knives for cutting up food, they are wonderful. If you use them to chop down walnut saplings in the back yard, there are other, better knives. Think of them as surgical instruments, not hatchets, and they'll serve you well.Secondly, the handles are raw wood. When you get the knife or knives, buy a small can of polyurethane and simply dip the handles and then hang the knife point up, allowing the excess to run off onto a newspaper. leave the knife hanging for 24 hours to allow the finish on the handle to cure. Steel wool the handle lightly with 0000 steel wool, and repeat the dip-hang-cure-steel wool process to get 3 or 4 good coats of polyurethane into the handle. This brings out the beauty of the wooden handles and toughens them considerably as well. It also prevents oils from hands or foods to build up in the wood's grain. I did this to the first of these knives I bought 4 years ago, and the finish is lasting and makes the knife cleaner as well.Lastly, hand wash and then hand dry these knives. They are not for the dishwasher. the hidden-tang handles hold moisture against the blade's tang and will eventually corrode even stainless steel (which is really stain-resistant, not stainLESS). Oil them occasionally with a drop of mineral oil, and sharpen as necessary.With a little care, these knives will be among the finest you own, and after acclimating to the different weight and balance of them, they will quickly become your favorite knives, lasting you for many years.5Essential ToolI love this knife.It is my go to knife and I only use it for cutting meat.I love the way it cuts chicken up for any dish I am doing.Haven't had to sharpen it yet and had it what about a couple months now.I use it nearly everyday.The only thing I can see that would be an improvement for me personally, is perhaps a plastic coating on the very end of the handle so that when I wash it, it can sit in the dish drainer for the cutlery without me worrying about the wood getting destroyed.As it is, I do not do that, I just dry it immediately after washing it.5Best knife for under $15It's amazing that you can purchase such an amazing, functional tool for less that $15. While usually known as a vegetable knife, I've experimented with it by sectioning chicken. It chops through chicken bones with ease and no chipping. Vegetables are where this knife excels, dicing potatoes and mincing garlic with ease. The curvature of the blade is well suited to chopping and mincing. This is a great all purpose tool, I could easily see using this everyday without a problem. If the handle ever does fall out, I'll epoxy it back together. The blade is so thin, it's very uncomfortable to pinch grip, the spine digs into your hand. I'll probably remedy this with some sandpaper. Just one little complaint, the rest is an outstanding value for your money.5Good but DangerousOkay, a little dramatic, but it's true if you're not careful. Love the scabbard. Love that it's Japanese made. Shape of blade is excellent for working on a cutting board. That said...I tend to use smaller knives in my hand, pulling the blade toward my thumb. I've used knives like this for a good 40 years so I'm used to it. I'd not recommend that method if you're unfamiliar with how to do it or if you're new to using knives.If you use them as I, the back corner of this blade (by the handle) is sharp and tends to stab you while you're working. It's not so bad that it's stopped me from using it, but it is something of which one might want to be aware. Adjusting your grip helps avoid it most of the time.It takes a nice, thin slice while pealing potatoes. That speaks volumes.The sharpened area is nice and large...see the different "coloring" of the blade. It's narrow, which I anticipate will make it easier to sharpen. Wide-width blades tend to be awful to keep sharp. Think Samurai sword and you get the gist.Wooden scabbard (or is it bamboo?) and handle. The blade is tight inside the handle. The scabbard helps keep that sharp corner from cutting or grabbing onto other things, so I intend to use it whenever the knife is not in use.The price is amazing given how nice this blade is. The scabbard looks "unfinished", but I don't really care. It's a tool I'm going to use, not an art piece to put on display. All in all, I like this knife and would recommend it to anyone who knows how to use one. Beginners...keep it to the cutting board. ;)4save your money and buy a knife that will last longerIt survived 3 months of light duty before the weak, cheap handle gave up.pros- it is light, it is sharp and stays sharp for a long period of time when used properly.cons- it lacks a full tang with will inevitably result in the knife falling apart, the steel is not a quality stainless steel it is a lower quality that will stain much easier than conventional stainless. I rinsed and washed the knife immediately after cutting every vegetable I used it on and the starchy veggies did some serious aesthetic damage after the first use.Did I mention it fell apart? it is a huge safety issue. There is literally no adhesive, no pins, and no shims holding the knife blade into the handle. the handle work is trash, the knife blade by itself is good quality for price. that's what you're paying for here.2Fantastic knife. Slaughters a brisket then slices tomatoes thin ... Careful, you will cut through your counter, floor, subfloor, basement ceiling, foundation, all the way to the center of the earth and back out again in China. Fantastic knife. Slaughters a brisket then slices tomatoes thin with no tearing whatsoever. I'm a fan. 5Good Blade, short tang, handles are so-so... short tang... other than that - keep it clean and sharpen it! I use a grinder and then traditional stones... handles are not the greatest, yet its a decent tool for my chef-kit, and I use it alot! 5s nice & cut like a razor It;s nice & cut like a razor. will refer to friends. 4... has really renewed my interest in preparing interesting and beautiful meals featuring vegetablesThis inexpensive knife has really renewed my interest in preparing interesting and beautiful meals featuring vegetables.As a weekend cook I did not want to spend a whole lot on a name brand knife so this was a cautiously made choice and I am very pleased with my decision. I watch a lot of youtube videos on how to prep food and my Dexter knives were too unwieldy. This light well balanced razor of a knife lets me feel like a chef when I get the urge to imitate my favorite cooking shows. You may have to sharpen it more often that a higher end knife (I wouldn't know) but at this price it's worth it to me, I think I'll buy a couple more while the price is right!4Nakiri Knife Great knife! Sharp as described. Cuts well and feels good in hand. Concerned about the bare wood on the handle, so taped up the plastic and applied a couple of coats of Danish Oil too protect from moisture. Looks great and no worries about getting water on the handle when cleaning. Just ordered the Santoku knife. 5Once you sharpen it, it's a very useful knife that holds an edge well.I thought I'd get this to practice sharpening by hand using a Japanese whet stone. My wife commented that it was dull out of the box. Once I sharpened it, it really hold an edge well. The handle needed a little sanding and you should oil it regularly (I use cutting-board quality mineral oil) and that works well and is inexpensive. If you need a knife to be sharp when you buy it, I wouldn't recommend this one. For my needs however it was a very good buy as sharpening has become somewhat of a hobby of mine.5great , very sharp this is light but really sharp 5
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